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"Show Us Your Papers"

I am way too busy these days for long political rants.

But I would be remiss if I do not at least make passing mention of how depressed, disgusted, and, yes, angry I've become as I watch the ongoing attempts at voter suppression in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, Iowa, and other states where Republicans and their Teabagger allies control key seats of power.

It is one thing to attempt to win elections. But trying to do so by denying the most basic and important right of any American citizen to hundreds and thousands of people, on entirely spurious grounds... that goes beyond reprehensible. That is despicable.

It would really be nice if there were still some Republicans of conscience out there who would stand up and loudly denounce these efforts, a few men of honor and integrity for whom "win the election" does not "win the election at any cost." There were once many Republicans I admired, even I disagreed with them: men like Everett Dirksen, Clifford Case, Henry Cabot Lodge, William Scranton... yes, even Barry Goldwater, conservative as he is. I do not believe for a moment that Goldwater would have approved of this, any more than Robert A. Heinlein would have. They were conservatives, but they were not bigots, nor racists, nor corrupt. The Vote Suppressors have far more in common with Lester Maddox, George Wallace, John Stennis, and their ilk than they do with their distinguished GOP forebears.

The people behind these efforts at disenfranchising large groups of voters (the young, the old, the black, the brown) are not Republicans, since clearly they have scant regard for our republic or its values. They are oligarchs and racists clad in the skins of dead elephants.

And don't tell me they are libertarians either. No true libertarians would ever support a culture where citizens must "show their papers" to vote or travel. That's a hallmark of a police state, not a free country.


TUESDAY ADDENDUM: Okay, this has been running several days now, has been featured on HUFFINGTON POST and ABC news, referenced on Stephanie Miller, and no doubt countless other people. We have had four hundred messages, and I think everyone has had their say, and everything that needs to be said has been said. Generally eight or ten times. There are plenty of links and references in the comment threads for those who would like to know more about these voter suppression efforts. If you don't want to dig through the links, start with the Brennan Center for Justice and get the facts.

There's no sense in letting this spin on in circles forever. I am locking comments. Back to Westeros and worldcon and similar subjects, boys and girls.

Thanks for listening.

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( 437 comments )
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ServantOnIce
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:23 am (UTC)
Wow, as a Black Republican, I disagree with this totally.
I am an African American or Black Man as I like to call myself, I don't agree with GRRM'S sentiments at all.

I am a bible believing Christian, I am also a huge fan of GRRM'S "Song of Ice and Fire" series and of the "Game of Thrones" TV shows. While my religious and political views are probably completely on the opposite end of the spectrum from many in the literary and entertainment world, I just don't agree with the idea that my party is filled with "racist windbags."

I have experienced racism as many folks have in this nation as I believe racism is a human condition. I don't think it is racism for ID for voting. I do know the history of this nation as my relatives lived through segregation in the South were my family has been since the days of slavery.

My Grandparents lived through KKK raids so when I hear someone complain about the voting purges being done as being "racist" I don't agree.

Are they being done to gain political advantage? Yes, same as when the Democrats allow illegal immigrants and non citizens to vote. But to say that my entire party is filled with racists and oligarchs that sounds like the Democrats in my opinion.

I just don't like when rhetoric goes "Bill Maher" or "Michael Savage" but when we can talk, even when pissed off with some sense.

I do like Jimmy Carter, after all he gave us Eight Years of Ronald Reagan.
Gina Gambony
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:15 am (UTC)
Re: Wow, as a Black Republican, I disagree with this totally.
Even if it were true that democrats allow non-citizens to vote---I'd still pick the side who chose to enfranchise the masses over the side who chose to make the weak increasingly powerless.
But it's not true--unless you have some evidence of this?
Kalon Wiggins
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:55 am (UTC)
new fan
"oligarchs and racists clad in the skins of dead elephants."
You mastery of the truth borders on poetry. You sir have a new fan.

(Deleted comment)
Dan Kurtz
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:07 pm (UTC)
Re: racists
Only an immature person or an ignorant one would erroneously call the Democratic Party the Democrat Party. Taking your cues from drug-addled idiots and colle dropouts does not make you well-informed. Moreover, only a person with their head in the sand actually believes in the "librul meedeeyah konspearasea" (sic). The media, especially, talk radio is owned by corporations. Large corporations that want lower corporate taxes and fewer regulations. That would be corporations like Newscorp. or Clear Channel, which not coincidently is owned by Bain, Romney's former company. Quelle surprise!
bobsoper
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:08 am (UTC)
Thanks for speaking out.
You hit the nail on the head, Mr. Martin.
If anything we should be encouraging people to exercise their franchise. In-person "voter fraud," which is what these (ALWAYS GOP-sponsored) voter-ID laws purport to remedy, is a non-existent problem.
The right wing doesn't play fair. They never have, and never will.
Daniel W. Turner
Aug. 14th, 2012 02:57 pm (UTC)
Re: Thanks for speaking out.
As a voter in Washington state where statewide elections have come down to just a few hundred votes (and there have been verifiable instances of fraud), I highly approve of laws requiring voters to show a photo ID at the polls. I have to routinely show my ID for identification purposes several times a week, so it doesn't seem unreasonable to me to do the same with voting.
Re: Thanks for speaking out. - MZDLO75 - Aug. 14th, 2012 08:29 pm (UTC) - Expand
smudgedidentity
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:28 am (UTC)
Really?
Teabaggers, George? Really?
grrm
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:43 am (UTC)
Re: Really?
I've addressed this point already.
Michael Way
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:33 am (UTC)
Teabagger? Really?
I remember back during the 2010 election a series of posts on this site that resulted in comments where the insults and name-calling became extremely nasty. George, you posted a note for calm and asked that every poster on this blog treat the other posters with respect, no matter their political affiliation, whether Democrat, Republican, Green, Libertarian...whatever . It was a well-crafted note, until you used the word Teabagger to refer to Tea Party members.

Right there you killed your message. As a wordsmith, you of all people should know the power of words, and while the "not-a-blog" is a more informal setting, where you perhaps didn't double-check your words, you still should have realized what you were saying. Surely you know the alternate meaning? When I read your message, all that popped in my mind was the image of some racist bigot saying "I'm not prejudiced - some of my best friends are (insert derogatory racial reference)". "Respect everyone, even the Teabaggers" - see how that sounds? I didn't call you out on it then, but I am going to call you out on it now.

You may dislike Tea Party members, you may disagree with them vehemently, but if we are EVER to get any semblance of bipartisanship again, if we are EVER to get this country united again, then such language needs to be eliminated. I'm sick of hearing liberals called "libtards" and "traitors" and I'm sick of hearing conservatives called "bigots" and I'm sick of hearing Tea Party members called "Teabaggers". These words kill any chance of reasonable discourse. The moment I hear them, I tune the message (and ultimately the messenger) out.
grrm
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:50 am (UTC)
Re: Teabagger? Really?
I've addressed this point already in a reply to an earlier post.

I do agree that both sides should cool the rhetoric. You make a pretty persuasive case on that, Michael.

But I must admit, I despise of ever seeing true bipartisanship return to our government again... and that is in no small party due to the Tea Party. Early in his first term, Obama made as much effort to reach across the aisle and work with the opposition than any president since Johnson, only to have his hand smacked every time he held it out. And after the 2010 election, when the Tea Party got several members into congress, all hopes of cooperation died. Every Republican who even thought of working with the Democrats, trying to compromise, or mounting a bipartisan effort was attacked and bullied by the extreme right wing of his or her own party.

Attitudes like that make passions run hot. On both sides.
Re: Teabagger? Really? - Dan Kurtz - Aug. 14th, 2012 03:07 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: Teabagger? Really? - burley8344 - Aug. 14th, 2012 06:33 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: Teabagger? Really? - grrm - Aug. 14th, 2012 06:51 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: Teabagger? Really? - shae_windham - Aug. 14th, 2012 05:51 am (UTC) - Expand
shae_windham
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:46 am (UTC)
This makes me so happy.
Travis Bone
Aug. 14th, 2012 09:19 am (UTC)
The game of political thrones
Interesting.

Being a middle class moderate, I could care one way or another about this political issue. I'll have to take some action, or I won't.

What's interesting is that you've taken a harsh stance on something you feel passionate about, but in the end you're only going to be affected negatively by this stance. People choose to buy fictitious books based on the content of the book, not the political affiliation or stances of the author. However, some people will decide not to buy a book because of the political affiliation or stances of the author.

Like Ned Stark, you've firmly taken a stance on something that will in no way effect you positively and can only effect you negatively.

I'm not sure whether to applaud you or sigh. Here's to honor!
grrm
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:23 pm (UTC)
Re: The game of political thrones
Even assuming you were right... (which you're not)... what good is us having free speech in this country if we are afraid to use it because it might cost us a few bucks?
(no subject) - fanoffun - Aug. 14th, 2012 09:32 pm (UTC) - Expand
Re: The game of political thrones - shae_windham - Aug. 14th, 2012 09:42 pm (UTC) - Expand
Lavhiram
Aug. 14th, 2012 09:34 am (UTC)
Turn back the clock
We have been here before. In the 1850's, the Free Soil Party tried to staunch the immigrant flow into USA. They created a party and managed to elect people and even had former President Mildred Fillmore run as their candidate. What Free Soil and now Tea Party lack is a pragmatic vision. Today as then, we have a need for immigrants. The Tea Party seems to lash out in very destructive ways. This whole thing with voter id is a classic example that flies in the face of precedent that allow an honor system of voting. In the past, when I talk about past I talk about over 50 years of questionable voting in which falls into vote early vote often. There is no indication that practice has happened recently. Sorry Fox News, you seem to make up these stories without a shred of evidence.

What we have is a broken immigrant policy that doesn't work. A political system so divided that it is impossible to do a simple humane thing by allowing minors the ability to gain citizenship. Somehow, that simple act we our rewarding people that broke the law? Come on, we invest in someones education and at the end; we say sorry but go somewhere else.

Believe or not, there are US citizens that don't have birth certificate because they were born under Jim Crow, so they have no drivers license and therefore no passport. They would be hard pressed to prove citizenship under some of these voter id laws since they don't recognize these situations. Like they have paid taxes for decades.

Slowly, these voter id laws are being shot down by the courts as bad and unconstitutional. I totally agree with Mr Martin's sentiments and it is a distraction from USA pressing problems that need to be addressed instead of focusing on these phantom problems.
Jonathan M Osment
Aug. 14th, 2012 12:19 pm (UTC)
How sad...
It is a very sad day, at least for me, when one of my favorite authors... has shown such a lack of reason and foresight. I have lost quite a bit of respect for George due to this and I hope he can come around to realize what he is posting is nothing more than political wrangling, one that fits a confirmation bias... rather than any objective truth or reason.


Over 160 counties in the US are already raising red flags. They have more voter registrations than they should have, not just by a small margin either.

The objective fact, the reality is, VOTER FRAUD is a huge problem in the United States of America. You cannot over look it and expect liberty much less democracy to work. It is not rational to not fight to find a solution to such a critical problem.

You need ID to drive a car, purchase alcohol, get a visa... There is nothing suppressive about requiring some sign that says they are who they say they are. If I come out and vote, I am not voting as an unknown, but a person, a citizen with a name. That name should be known and verified. It is not irrational to ask this when my vote affects (or gives the illusion of affecting) the future of the USA.

I would be more than glad to hear alternative solutions to suppressing voter fraud... but can you name something better proving you are who you say you are, especially when your vote under your name, as a citizen, is put forth in an official manner? Should someone be allowed to steal your vote? Voter fraud has the same effect as stealing or diminishing the vote. Not requiring ID.

A proactive, intelligent response would be to find a solution. Why not call for IDs to be given out free to those who cant afford it?

I highly doubt that is the case, but that is the argument one side is making...that it "disenfranchises voters". But their evidence is not really based on reason or sound factual evidence, and if it were more than empty rhetoric, a means to trigger emotional reactions for the sake of political maneuvering, then why not call for a solution rather than preventing one.

I am asking for wisdom, I am asking for intelligence, a rational approach that recognizes the confirmation bias and squashes it in order to achieve the optimal result.

George, your comments towards what a republic are and are not clearly show to me you are not aware of what defines a republic. It is based on LAW, a law is a means of order and if it is Order intended for the people, then protecting the sanctity of the vote is in line with the republic.

Dont forget, John Adam's once said "Democracy... while it lasts is more bloody than either aristocracy or monarchy. Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There is never a democracy that did not commit suicide."

I would hope you of all people would know the history of man well enough to see this.

I also do not see how one could be angry at the republican party and not the democrat party, and vice versa. Both are equally responsible for the degrading of liberty and the perversion of government. Corruption abounds in both parties and if any emotional response must be given, it should be done so because our whole political system is a corrupt mess.

We need solutions, not biases or political affiliations. Step out of the box and look in.

markwise
Aug. 14th, 2012 01:21 pm (UTC)
We must safeguard outr voting process. We must ensure that the votes are as accurate as possible. To do so is to make sure voters have a valid photo ID. We require such valid photo IDs to buy cigs, alcohol, hotel rent hotel rooms, rent cars, apply for food stamps, welfare, and countless other things in our daily lives. Why should we not also require it in the most important thing a person can do as a citizen?

I guess so that Democrats can keep sneaking in illegal aliens to vote, the mentally challenged, people to vote multiple times, and people to vote using dead people's names.
grrm
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:27 pm (UTC)
Almost none of that actually occurs, markwise.

Why do you insist on parroting such falsehoods? There are a lot of people who know the actual facts in this forum.

C'mon, read the studies we've cited, learn the truth.
Matt Shelby
Aug. 14th, 2012 01:32 pm (UTC)
While I don't deny that the motivation behind requiring IDs to vote may be entirely politically motivated, and with the desire that a certain bloc of unfriendly voters can't vote, I don't necessarily have a problem with requiring some ID. Voter fraud does happen and it shouldn't. Requiring ID helps this. Can someone explain a scenario where one would truly be "disenfranchised" by having to get an ID? Maybe there's something I'm missing, but I just can't see a scenario where one who has a legal right to vote will be entirely prevented from voting. Sure, it'll take some effort. But driving to the polling place takes effort too. If someone doesn't have a mode of transportation or a way to cast an absentee ballot, are they being disenfranchised too? The argument is spurious at best. I don't necessarily like the motivations, but I also don't see the inherent unfairness that some seem to think is obvious.
BigDooleyStrong
Aug. 14th, 2012 01:47 pm (UTC)
George, why did you go and ruin a good thing?
I am a huge fan of your writing but to come out and demonize a portion of your reading audience as "Teabaggers" is extremely arrogant, downright stupid, or a combination of both. I am not a "Teabagger" by association by I do find myself asking many of the same questions that a large majority of middle-America is asking nowadays. I find myself wondering why I should waste another dollar or another minute of my time reading your work while you degrade the ideas and principles that I and several million other people stand for. Hopefully I can forget this whole episode but I'm afraid its going to be in the forefront of my mind the next time I go to pick up your book. Thanks a lot!
Graham Bowman
Aug. 14th, 2012 01:54 pm (UTC)
More GRRM thoughts on Democracy?
George,

While I whole-heartedly agree with everything you wrote, I find the tone to be surprisingly different than what I imagine your world-view to be based on ASOIAF.

A general theme in your books seems to be that, almost inevitably, high minded institutions and practices become subverted by nasty people. The "few men of honor" who stand up and loudly denounce unjust practices are seldom rewarded, nor do they achieve the outcomes they desire.

I am curious, after reading this post, to hear what your general thoughts are on American democracy and the related concept of "a national dialogue?" It is a topic you've only addressed a little bit in ASOIAF. Do you believe that our system is vulnerable to the same unaccountable corruption you find in ASOIAF? Or, is there something about our system of democracy and free-speech you find special, such as the ability to popularize the speech of the "few men of honor," that changes the rules?

peach_megumi
Aug. 14th, 2012 02:03 pm (UTC)
The Webster dictionary defines "republic" as: "a government in which supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to law".

In which supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote. I feel that a lot of the so-called Republicans in this country have forgotten what they are meant to be, and also what it meant to the founders whose names they are so fond of invoking. The United States was built on the desire to have fair representation in government. That involves the right to vote - fairly and regardless of economic or political or social standing.
Connie Bailey
Aug. 14th, 2012 02:41 pm (UTC)
Show us your Papers
George RR Martin .............thank you for some sanity. Connie
cbwolfe1987
Aug. 14th, 2012 03:01 pm (UTC)
I don't see what the big idea is.
You should have identification on you at all times. I don't leave my house without any. As such, I can not comprehend why it is an issue to have to prove who you are to vote. I'm 24. I have refused thus far to vote since it is my right to NOT vote the same as it is to vote and frankly, you're picking your own poison right now and that sits terribly with me. I refuse to pick who is going to screw us over more. But, I had no idea you didn't have to show ID until recently. It is outright common sense. My head hurts thinking that this is an issue and that people are up in arms over it. I am strongly anti-Politician, and even stronger anti-Republican. But hell, I agree with having to have ID. If you can't secure any and you're of the correct age, grow up. Start acting like an adult. I mean, we don't let people under 18 vote because they aren't supposed to be intelligent or mature enough or whatever to understand, research and make informed opinions about politics. But we're letting people who can't secure an ID, who are too immature to be able to identify themselves vote? Let's face it, many of those people are on welfare. And as such, a great many of them are less educated than so many of our young adults aren't educated or mature enough to vote. Now I am wholly for welfare. Further, I am by no means anti-socialist, not that I want socialism in our country (though having socialist policies isn't bad by any means and the potential to have them is what makes our country great), but the state of the welfare system in this country reprehensible. There are so many things wrong right now with this country that it would be better to start from scratch.



Edited at 2012-08-14 03:02 pm (UTC)
Kim Lores
Aug. 14th, 2012 03:16 pm (UTC)
well said
I've been saying for some time this Republican Party has been driven off the cliff. I've not seen anything like it in my lifetime. I'm wondering really if there is some mental illness associated with this type of behavior and thought process. To not have any care for the poor, for animal welfare, the environment, the elderly, the disenfranchised, war veterans, social safety nets, the list is endless, but to only care about not taxing the rich. I've just described a person I would not want to know. It's a terribly greedy and selfish mindset overall. It seems with the teabagger mentality, the Party is going so far right as to be driving itself into oblivion. It seems they have to lie, steal, including stealing peoples right to vote, in order to stay in the game. More than sad, it's criminal. The political mind-set of the GOP does seem to be on the decline thankfully.
maeglin73
Aug. 14th, 2012 03:35 pm (UTC)
Very well said.
Tigger Perfferle
Aug. 14th, 2012 03:40 pm (UTC)
Yes but...
.... they are increasingly being rumbled for fixing the electronic voting machines and they are getting ever less popular, so what can they do?
Dmitry Roth
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:02 pm (UTC)
strongly disagree and you insult many Americans with your "teabagger" slur
i happen to be a big fan of your books and have read most of them, while i understand that people are entitled to their opinions i have a few gripes. Your use of the slur "teabgger" to describe Americans who are tired of a ever encroaching statist govt is extremely offensive. You seem to be concerned about an Americans inalienable right to freedom based off your aversion to a national i.d, yet you readily profess to support a president who is using ever more dictatorial and unconstitutional powers to force the encroachment of govt into our every day lives.

How can you claim to be for freedom and yet support a statist health care system that takes away an Individuals choice of service, where an unaccountable and unelected board of bureaucrats choose whether or not a life saving procedure is cost effective or not?. How can you support a president who is now simply issuing laws via executive fiat?. The new immigration law that Obama simply pronounced being a recent example. The direction that Obama wishes to go down is not one rooted in the American narrative, but from the tomes of Marx and Trotsky.

Furthermore the voting I.D issue goes both ways. The Obama administrations lawsuit in Ohio is meant to prevent active duty servicemen from being allowed to vote early, they overwhelmingly vote republican. This issue of voter I.D fraud is directly tied to ACORN, which submitted thousands of fraudulent registration forms in every state in which they were operating, the same ACORN that Obama both advocated and worked for as a "community organizer". Dead people, cartoon characters were among the small sample of people that ACORN signed up to vote. Acorn subsequently faced a litany of federal lawsuits and state investigations due to their actions. They have since been disbanded due to a recent sting operation where their operatives were eager to assist in underage prostitution operations. They have however, reformed under a different name.

For someone so astute at creating politically charged literature your support for 2 of the worst presidents in living memory is quite befuddling, Jimmy Carter? the man who ushered in stagflation and economic depression and who prances around the middle east shreiking about the evil Jews? cmon.... very disappointed in your worldview, hopefully this myopia won't carry over into your books...

MZDLO75
Aug. 14th, 2012 08:50 pm (UTC)
Re: strongly disagree and you insult many Americans with your "teabagger" slur
The Baggers named themselves Teabaggers. I saw the signs when they congregated across the country boycotting President Obama. I used a picture of a women holding a sign reading "Teabagging for Jesus" as my PCs wallpaper for a year. Do not get angry because some of us will not allow Baggers to have selective memories when it comes to the origin of their party's name.
Ivey West
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:03 pm (UTC)
Question
As someone who considers himself an independent, I'm just curious why people who are not naturalized citizens should be allowed the opportunity to vote in this country?
Dmitry Roth
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:13 pm (UTC)
strongly disagree and you insult many Americans with your "teabagger" slur
i happen to be a big fan of your books and have read most of them, while i understand that people are entitled to their opinions i have a few gripes. Your use of the slur "teabgger" to describe Americans who are tired of a ever encroaching statist govt is extremely offensive. You seem to be concerned about an Americans inalienable right to freedom based off your aversion to a national i.d, yet you readily profess to support a president who is using ever more dictatorial and unconstitutional powers to force the encroachment of govt into our every day lives.

How can you claim to be for freedom and yet support a statist health care system that takes away an Individuals choice of service, where an unaccountable and unelected board of bureaucrats choose whether or not a life saving procedure is cost effective or not?. How can you support a president who is now simply issuing laws via executive fiat?. The new immigration law that Obama simply pronounced being a recent example. The direction that Obama wishes to go down is not one rooted in the American narrative, but from the tomes of Marx and Trotsky.

Furthermore the voting I.D issue goes both ways. The Obama administrations lawsuit in Ohio is meant to prevent active duty servicemen from being allowed to vote early, they overwhelmingly vote republican. This issue of voter I.D fraud is directly tied to ACORN, which submitted thousands of fraudulent registration forms in every state in which they were operating, the same ACORN that Obama both advocated and worked for as a "community organizer". Dead people, cartoon characters were among the small sample of people that ACORN signed up to vote. Acorn subsequently faced a litany of federal lawsuits and state investigations due to their actions. They have since been disbanded due to a recent sting operation where their operatives were eager to assist in underage prostitution operations. They have however, reformed under a different name.

For someone so astute at creating politically charged literature your support for 2 of the worst presidents in living memory is quite befuddling, Jimmy Carter? the man who ushered in stagflation and economic depression and who prances around the middle east shreiking about the evil Jews? cmon.... very disappointed in your worldview, hopefully this myopia won't carry over into your books...

grrm
Aug. 14th, 2012 05:11 pm (UTC)
Re: strongly disagree and you insult many Americans with your "teabagger" slur
Dmitry, you are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own facts. Your post is full of falsehoods.

The stuff about ACORN? Total bullshit.

The stuff about the Obama justice department trying to prevent military voting? Completely false. Numerous other posters have refuted that in other posts here.

The stuff about the health care system? Distorted, false, without basis in fact. "Obamacare" is far from perfect -- we really need a single-payer system, like Canada, Australian, England, France, and the rest of the first world. But Obama's reforms will be a vast improvement over what we had, which was a disgrace.

Equating Obama with Trotsky? C'mon. Crap like that has no credibility whatsovere.
Sam Trenholme
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:19 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure Heinlein would be upset over his law
Mr. Martin,

I agree with everything you write, except that I'm not sure Heinlein would have been upset over this type of voter suppression.

Heinlein, as it turns out, in "Expanded Universe", rants about how too many people have the vote, are voting for themselves to have "Bread and Circuses", and how only people who can solve a quadratic equation or pay a lot of money should be allowed to vote. And, of course, only military veterans are allowed to vote in "Starship Troopers".

- Sam
Psilocide
Aug. 14th, 2012 04:27 pm (UTC)
Democracy
Thanks for standing up - the integrity of our democracy is not something anyone should sit down for; Democrat or Republican.
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