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We're Number One...

... in graphic novels.

The second volume of the GAME OF THRONES graphic novel debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list:


(And, hey, the following week's list is out, and we're still number one).

My thanks and congratulations to Daniel Abraham (who wrote the script) and Tommy Patterson (who drew the pictures) and Mike S. Miller (who did the covers). They do all the real work on this one. This is their triumph, much more than mine.

I'm glad so many of you are enjoying the funny book.


Jul. 11th, 2013 02:52 am (UTC)
Re: House Martell Casting
I do "keep largely away" from my internet fandom. For one thing, there is so much of it. Which is great, but also means it would be impossible to keep up. Also, while 99% of my fans are great, there is always that last percent, the ones who are nasty, abusive, etc. And some of them can get VERY abusive.

I am aware of how Lt. Uhura helped to inspire Whoopie Goldberg. The original STAR TREK was a ground-breaking series in many ways, and for that I applaud them. Permit me to point out, however, that Uhura was always a secondary character. Kirk was the hero of that show. The others were supporting characters. A supporting character can, I think, be a good character... interesting, vital, intriguing... and yes, even inspirational.

Depending on which book we are discussing, I have anywhere from seven to sixteen POV characters... but hundreds of supporting characters, in varying degrees of importance. And some of them are HUGELY important, and very popular as well. Varys, Littlefinger, Bronn, the Hound, the Queen of Thorns... none of them are POV characters, but all of them have more fans, and more "screen time," than such POV characters as Quentyn Martell, Arys Oakheart. Areo Hotah, Damphair, and so forth. Just because a character has a supporting role does not mean they have no worth.

Yes, I do understand the desire of some readers to "see themselves" in books, television shows, films, etc. At least I understand it intellectually. Emotionally, maybe less so. As an old time comic book geek, I know that Robin was added to Batman so kids would have someone to identify with... but even I was a kid, I never identified with Robin. I identified with Batman. Like every other kid I knew.

That being said, I do my best to include a diverse cast of characters, of all races, colors, and ethnicities, and will continue to do so.


George R.R. Martin
George R. R. Martin

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