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Podcast from Greywater

A million years ago when dinosaurs roamed the earth and I looked more or less like the guy in the picture there, (1972, actually), I took a train down from Chicago, where I was living and working at the time, to Kansas City. There, at the very first KC science fiction convention, MidAmericaCon (not to be confused with the later worldcon, MidAmericon), I met Howard Waldrop. H'ard and I had been corresponding for almost a decade, since the fall of 1963, when I bought a copy of BRAVE AND BOLD #28 from him for a quarter. But he lived in Texas, and I lived in New Jersey, and never the twain had met.

Till KC.

We were both fledgling sf writers at the time, each of us with a few short story sales under our belt. When we met, we did what fledgling writers often did in those days: we decided to write a story together. We actually left the Playboy Club atop the con hotel to begin it. (Probably just as well. Beers were real expensive up there, I recall -- a whole quarter).

We only wrote a few pages at the con, but we kept at it afterwards, sending the manuscript back and forth, until it was done. "Men of Greywater Station," we called it. Pretty much everybody in the field rejected it until it finally got to the lowest paying magazine, where it was purchased and, finally, published. The readers seemed to like it well enough.

Howard and I remain close friends to this day, but we never collaborated again. Our styles were just too different. But it was fun doing it once.

And now, all these years later, it's been done as a podcast by Starship Sofa:

http://www.starshipsofa.com/blog/2015/06/03/starshipsofa-no-389-george-r-r-martin/

Check it out for yourself. It's free, and I thought they did a nice job.

Comments

runyan
Jun. 11th, 2015 03:20 pm (UTC)
Howard's Influence?
I'm not acquainted with Howard's work, but I read on wiki that his stories "combine elements such as alternate history, American popular culture, the American South...", so I'm wondering if his work had any influence when you wrote Fevre Dream? Either way I'm looking forward to checking out the podcast.
kalimac
Jun. 11th, 2015 04:21 pm (UTC)
Fevre Dream doesn't have that gonzo flair to it, it's more a story of raw emotional intensity - I'm sure that's part of what GRRM means when he says his and Waldrop's styles are very different - but it's sho nuff a Waldrop-type premise. So I too wonder. I'm trying to imagine what it'd be like if Waldrop had written it, and all I can say is, "Wow." You'd lose a lot of what makes that book great, so I'm not regretting or criticizing GRRM's novel, but ... wow.
Michael J. Walsh
Jun. 12th, 2015 02:24 am (UTC)
Re: Howard's Influence?
Oh, are you in for a treat ... discovering Howard Waldrop!

There are 4 books worth tracking down:

Howard Who? - his first collection, includes the classic "The Ugly Chickens".

These two retrospective collections:
Things Will Never Be the Same: A Howard Waldrop Reader: Selected Short Fiction 1980-2005
Other Worlds, Better Lives: A Howard Waldrop Reader: Selected Long Fiction 1989-2003

(Some overlap with Howard Who?, but not much.)

And lastly, his most recent collection:
Horse of a Different Color: Stories

"Howard Waldrop doesn't have e-mail. He doesn't have a word processor. He doesn't surf the Internet. I guess that means he spends most of his time writing. From my point of view as a devoted Waldrop reader, I'm eternally grateful to the Luddite in him." – Janis Ian

(Yes, that Janis Ian)




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